coach taking stats Volleyball StatsKeeping stats in volleyball is not as hard as it looks, and it is in everyone's best interest that we learn how to keep stats in volleyball properly. 

This makes sense for the players so they know where they need to improve their skills and for validation for their strengths.  

It is also crucial for the coaches so they know where and how to strengthen their offense and defense as a team – and where to support and encourage their individual players.

Some players naturally attract attention on the court, and others go quietly through the game doing their job mostly unnoticed. 

All players fall somewhere on the spectrum of "perceived talent." 

Even the best coaches are subject to these perceptions which can color what they see on the court, unless they have solid stats to back them up. 

That is why coaches not only seek out strong and accurate stats, they use that information to  so they can do their best for their players and their team.

Joe Navarro, and ex F.B.I agent who authored the book, "What Every Body is Saying," states that even when one has what appears to be solid visual clues in front of him/her, with which to form an opinion (on anything), as an expert in the field of reading visual clues, his perception is still wrong around 50% of the time!

Imagine how wrong, as every day people, our visual perceptions are. 

We must have solid facts to back up what we think we see – and from there we can form solid and unbeatable offensive and defensive game plans.

This is our favorite explanation on how to keep stats in volleyball

We thank the NCAA for posting this information.

For beginners, here are exerpts from the above publication::

SECTION 1—ATTACKS

Article 1. An attack attempt (ATT) is recorded any time a  player attempts to attack (hit strategically) the ball into the opponent’s court. The ball may be spiked, set, tipped or hit as anoverhead contact. There are three possible outcomes of an attack attempt.

(1) There can be a kill.
(2) There can be an attack error.
(3) The ball can stay in play. This is referred to as a “0 attack (zero attack).”

Philosophy:

Any ball that is played over the net in an attempt
to score a point should be considered an attack. Any ball
played over the net simply to keep the ball alive should not be
considered an attack attempt. The exceptions to an attack attempt are:

(1) An attempt is not charged on a ball played over the net on serve reception that is kept in play by the opposing team. This is called an overpass.
(2) An attempt is not charged on a free ball played over the net when, in the opinion of the statistician, the free ball is passed only to keep the ball in play.
(3) An attempt is not charged to a player if, in the opinion of the statistician, the set is bad and the player plays the ball over the net only to keep the ball in play.
(4) An attempt is not charged to a player if, in the opinion of the statistician, the player passes the ball over the net only to keep it in play.

However, if in any of the four above-mentioned instances the action results directly in a point for the team playing the ball, a kill (see Article 2), and therefore an attack attempt, must be awarded.
 

SECTION 2—ASSISTS

A player is awarded an assist (A) whenever that player passes, sets or digs the ball to a teammate who attacks the ball for a kill. There are three possible outcomes of a ball that is being set:

(1) An assist.
(2) An assist error or ball-handling error.
(3) A zero assist. This occurs when a ball that is set does not directly lead to a kill. Documentation on the work sheet only is required if the statistician is calculating assists percentage.

 

SECTION 3—SERVES

Article 1. A serve is when a player attempts to serve the ball over the net into the opponent’s court. There are  three possible outcomes for every served ball:

(1) A service ace.
(2) A service error.
(3) A zero serve. This occurs when a serve does not result in a service ace or service error, but play continues. Documentation on the work sheet is required only if the statistician is calculating serve percentage.

Article 2. A service ace (SA) is a serve that results directly in a point. A service ace is awarded to a player:

(1) If the serve strikes the opponent’s court untouched.
(2) If the serve is passed by the opponent but cannot be kept in play.
(3) If the referee calls a violation on the receiver (i.e., lift, double hit).
(4) If the receiving team is out of rotation (i.e., overlap).

Article 3. A service error (SE) is charged to a player:

(1) If the serve fails to go over the net and lands on the side of the team serving.
(2) If the serve is out of bounds or hits the antenna.
(3) If the server foot-faults or takes too much time.
(4) If the server tosses more than once for service.
(5) If a player serves out of rotation. The service error (SE) is charged to the player who should have been serving.

(Passing: Serve Receives)

Article 4. A serve reception is when a player attempts to pass a successful serve attempt. There are two possible outcomes when a player attempts to pass a served ball:

(1) A service reception error.
(2) A zero service reception. This occurs when a player continues play by successfully passing a served ball and the pass does not result in a kill or lead directly to a kill by a teammate. Note: Documentation on the work sheet is
required only if the statistician is calculating serve reception percentage.

Article 5. A reception error (RE) is charged to a player:

(1) If the serve strikes the floor in the area of the player.
(2) If the player passes the serve but it cannot be kept in play by his or her team.
(3) If the player is called for a reception violation by the referee (i.e., lift, double hit).

Article 6. Reception errors should not be charged to an individual when team reception errors (TRE) are charged. A team reception error is charged when:

(1) A serve falls between two players and the statistician cannot determine which player is responsible.
(2) The receiving team is out of rotation. In both cases, the server receives an ace. The team reception
error should be noted on the work sheet and tabulated in the team totals on the Box Score Form.
 
Article 7. When a service ace is awarded to one team, a reception error is charged to the other team. In the final compilation of the statistics, the total number of reception errors of one team must equal the total number of service aces of the other team.

 

SECTION 4—DIGS

A dig (D) is awarded when a player passes the ball that has been attacked by the opposition. Digs are given only when players receive an attacked ball and it is kept in play, not when a ball is brought up off a “put back” (blocked ball).

Philosophy:

The pass or play of any ball that is attacked is awarded a dig. The ball can be kept in play on the digger’s side of the net or can go back to the opposition. In either case, a dig is awarded. Note: If an attack, as defined in Section 1, occurs and the ball is kept in play, then a player on the defending team receives a dig.
 

SECTION 5—BLOCKS

Article 1. A block is awarded when a player(s) blocks the ball that comes off an attack into the opponent’s court, leading directly to a point. There are three possible outcomes when a player(s) is blocking:

(1) The player(s) is credited with a successful block solo or block assist.
(2) The player is charged with a block error.
(3) The attack attempt is deflected off the blocker’s hands and is kept in play by one of the teams.

Article 2. A block solo (BS) is awarded when a single player blocks the ball into the opponent’s court leading directly to a point. That player must be the only blocker attempting to block the ball.

Article 3. A block assist (BA) is awarded when two or three players block the ball into the opponent’s court leading directly to a point. Each player blocking receives a block assist, even if only one player actually
makes contact with the ball. Note: Both a block solo and a block assist cannot be awarded on the
same play.

Article 4. A blocking error (BE) is a call made by the referee that ends play.

Article 5. A player is charged with a blocking error when:

(1) A blocker goes into the net.
(2) A blocker is called for a center-line fault.
(3) A blocker is called for reaching over the net.
(4) A back-row player is called for blocking.
(5) A blocker is called for a thrown ball during a block.

 

SECTION 6—CALCULATED CATEGORIES

When a player enters the set, that player gets credit statistically for participating. If the player only played front row, the set still counts for all statistical categories (e.g., aces per set). Similarly, if the playeronly played back row, the set still counts for blocks and kills per set. While totals in these categories may be zero, there is no  discrimination between front-row sets and back-row sets.

Total attempts (TA) are the total of all attempts within a category.

 

Kills Per Set    Total Kills    
(K/S) = Total Sets Played  
     
Hitting Percentage Total Kills – Total Errors   
(Pct) Total Attack Attempts  
     
Assists Per Set   Total Assists   
(Ast/S) Total Sets Played  
     
Service Aces Per Set    Total Aces    
(A/S) Total Sets Played  
     
Digs Per Set    Total Digs    
(D/S) Total Sets Played  
     
  For Individual Players  
Blocks Per Set Total Solo + Total Assist  
  Total Sets Played  
     
  For Team  
Blocks Per Set Total Solo + 1/2 Total Assist  
  Total Sets Played  

                                                                                                                                           

Now that you have the basics, you can read more about how to determine what to count for each stat by examining some example plays in this NCAA document on how to keep stats in volleyball.

For another type of explanation on how to keep stats in volleyball, check out this great power point presentation from the AVCA.

 

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